Dedicated to Improving Pelvic and Abdominal Health Globally

CSM 2019 Sessions Sponsored by Section on Women’s Health


Thursday, January 24, 2019

8:00 AM – 10:00 AM

From Potty Trainers to Teenagers: Building Healthy Foundations in Active Girls (2984181)

SPEAKERS: Julia E. Granger, Kari Lindegren, Christine B. Mansfield

DESCRIPTION: Young female patients have needs that occur at the crossroads of specialty knowledge among women’s health, pediatric, orthopaedic, and sports physical therapists. They may struggle with movement activity due to a number of factors attributable to normal and abnormal developmental milestones, medical conditions, pelvic health, and sports injuries, and they may have physical, psychological, cognitive, or emotional developmental needs that require early intervention from a prevention or rehabilitation standpoint. Evidence supports age-appropriate female-specific biopsychosocial approaches to evaluation, management, and prevention of several conditions throughout the course of a young female’s development to help establish a strong foundation of movement fundamentals for healthy movement literacy and health management into adulthood. This session connects theoretical constructs with clinical reasoning to address the biopsychosocial aspects of movement and health dysfunction specific to young female clients. It bridges the gaps between women’s health, pediatric, orthopaedic, and sports physical therapists, allowing specialists from these 4 areas to design age-appropriate programs to address the comprehensive needs of the active young female client. This session includes lecture, demonstration and practice skills, exercises, and discussions of interventions to restore optimal movement and function. Participants will leave with strategies to implement in practice.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Upon completion of this course, you will be able to:

  1. Discuss the unique physical differences and histories of young, developing female athletes that can have an impact on their injury vulnerability, response to rehabilitation, and considerations for return to fitness and sport.
  2. Identify and discuss the long-term effects of pertinent health history factors.
  3. Demonstrate an understanding of the interrelationship between brain, trunk, and spinal growth on the diaphragm, abdominal wall, and pelvic floor development and their influence on development of central stability, breathing mechanics, urinary and bowel continence, balance, and sport/activity performance.
  4. Design age-appropriate, activity-specific, integrative and holistic health treatment and intervention programs that consider the unique biopsychosocial challenges to promote maximized results and prevent future women’s health concerns.

Sexual Assault and Communities of Color: PT Roles (2985930)

SPEAKERS:  Lauren H. Collins

DESCRIPTION: This session identifies issues surrounding working with survivors of sexual assault and trauma, with an emphasis on working with communities of color and the role of physical therapists in the healing process. The prevalence of sexual assault among women is about 1 in 5. Sexual assault trauma is a cause of chronic pain issues and musculoskeletal dysfunctions among women. The percentages of women affected in communities of color is higher in relation to population percentages vs white women. Women of color are working with a system culturally biased against them. Women of color have a level of distrust for the medical system. Women of color may have decreased access to resources and insurance, and maybe a language barrier. There is a historical trauma with women of color. Women of color practice healing differently than white women. Through lecture and small group discussions, participants discuss the role pelvic health physical therapists play in working with survivors, cultural competency around working with survivors of color, and future roles for PTs in participation with survivors.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Upon completion of this course, you will be able to:

  1. Identify cultural biases against women of color in general and in the medical field.
  2. Analyze historical trauma.
  3. Assess better ways to connect and build trust with women of color.
  4. Examine current and potentially future roles of pelvic health PTs in working with survivors.

 

Global Volunteerism: From Organization to Boots on the Ground: Part 1 (3008030)

SPEAKERS: Emma Stokes

DESCRIPTION: There are a vast number of opportunities for volunteering on a global scale as a women’s health physical therapist. However, it can be difficult to discern what organizations are legitimate when trying to participate in leadership. This session is the first part of a 3-part discussion that will educate participants on the opportunities for global leadership in education, national organizations, and medical volunteer trips. The speaker, president of the World Confederation of Physiotherapy, discusses the creation of this organization and the opportunities for leadership in the physical therapy profession on a global scale. The speaker also examines being a woman in a national position of leadership.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Upon completion of this course, you will be able to:

  1. Examine the origins of international physical therapist organizations, such as the World Confederation of Physiotherapy.
  2. Identify opportunities for student organizations to volunteer on a global scale.

 


11:00 AM – 1:00 PM

Pelvic Floor Training for the Older Adult (2986981)

SPEAKERS: Erin M. Davis, Sarah Cooper

DESCRIPTION: Genitourinary symptoms affect approximately 20% of the population over the age of 65, and urinary incontinence is present in nearly 64% of institutionalized older adults. The pelvic floor is an element of the musculoskeletal system that is frequently overlooked in entry-level physical therapy education; this is despite the higher risk of falls and increased personal and health care costs associated with urinary and bowel impairments. This session develops understanding of the male and female pelvic floor musculature, while applying exercise principles specific to the older adult. Application of research and evidence-based techniques are described across the continuum of care, demonstrating specific cases from all physical therapy settings. Participants are guided through case examples, gaining skills that can be immediately implemented in the clinic.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Upon completion of this course, you will be able to:

  1. Develop basic assessments of male and female pelvic floor anatomy and physiology, urinary continence, and fecal continence related to the older adult.
  2. Apply dosing and exercise prescription education to the older adult for exercises and management strategies specific to pelvic floor.
  3. Discuss and evaluate, through case studies, the appropriate application of male and female pelvic floor education/exercise.

 

Diastasis Rectus Abdominis (DRA) Moving the Evidence to Practice-Based Solutions (2988120)

co-sponsored with Academy of Geriatric Physical Therapy

 

SPEAKERS: Julia Di Paolo

DESCRIPTION: Evidence suggests that up to 100% of pregnant women will get a diastasis rectus abdominis (DRA) in the third trimester, but in over 100 years there still lacks consensus as to what constitutes an optimal IRD for physical function. Further, a recent randomized controlled trial failed to correlate the IRD with pelvic floor dysfunction. As such, a shift is occurring positioning DRA as an issue of functional loss of the integrity of the linea alba, which is integral to the thoraco-pelvic abdominal manometric system, rather than a gap between the superficial rectus abominis muslces. This session explores the multidimensional and multifactorial impairment. It looks at current research on treatment and outcome measures, and explores newer trends in the treatment of DRA that consider tension of the abdominal wall and linea alba, the manometric pressure system and pelvic floor function, through a review of case studies that just may bring up more questions than answers.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Upon completion of this course, you will be able to:

  1. Identify current literature on assessment techniques and outcome measures for DRA.
  2. Examine current literature on treatment for DRA.
  3. Summarize evidence and practice-based research principles through application to several case studies.

 

Global Volunteerism: From Organization to Boots on the Ground- Part 2 (3008037)

SPEAKERS: Theresa Spitznagle, Susan C. Clinton

DESCRIPTION: There are a vast number of opportunities for volunteering on a global scale as a women’s health physical therapist. However, it can be difficult to discern what organizations are legitimate. This session is the second part of a 3-part discussion that educates participants on the opportunities for global leadership in education, national organizations, and medical volunteer trips. It is a panel discussion with Jill Boissonault, International Organization of Physical Therapists in Women’s Health (IOPTWH); Rebecca Stephenson, International Education Committee of the Section on Women’s Health; Tracy Spitznagle, Worldwide Fistula Fund; and Susan Clinton, Global Women’s Health Initiative.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Upon completion of this course, you will be able to:

  1. Examine opportunities for international education within the field of women’s health physical therapy.
  2. Identify appropriate charitable organizations to explore when looking for volunteer opportunities.
  3. Describe the origins of the IOPTWH.


3:00 PM – 5:00 PM

Biopsychosocial Implications in Pelvic Health: Why Wine and Relaxation Won’t Work (2978796)

SPEAKERS: Emily J. Finn

DESCRIPTION: Pelvic floor dysfunction and biopsychosocial impairments—good luck treating one without addressing the other! This session illustrates integration of the 3 pillars of evidenced-based practice, as related to pelvic physical therapy through various case examples, including a young adult female with primary vaginismus; a male with severe pelvic pain and urinary incontinence postprostatectomy; a female with vulvodynia following sexual assault; and a male with interstitial cystitis whose symptoms correlate directly to stressful life events. Participants will leave this session with a better understanding of how to successfully apply biopsychosocial concepts to patient care. This session also includes strategies for effective patient education and indications for referral to promote multidisciplinary treatment.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Upon completion of this course, you will be able to:

  1. Identify pertinent biopsychosocial factors relevant to different pelvic health diagnoses that require consideration for a successful physical therapy plan of care.
  2. Differentiate biopsychosocial constructs and their relevance to pelvic floor dysfunction.
  3. Describe situations that warrant referral to another practitioner, given a patient’s psychological and socioeconomic characteristics.

 

Sports Performance Programming for the Pregnant and Postpartum Female Athlete (2981475)

SPEAKERS: Carol Ferkovic Mack, Meghan Rohde

DESCRIPTION: This session is designed for students, new graduate physical therapists, and seasoned therapists who wish to deepen their knowledge of the pregnant and postpartum athlete. Attendees learn maternal and fetal physiology as well as the indications, contraindications, and precautions for all types of exercise in the female athlete population. The speakers discuss the signs and symptoms of emergency indications to terminate exercise, special tests related to pelvic girdle pain, diastasis recti, and pelvic floor dysfunction. Participants learn how the changes in the center of mass affect technique and performance in athletes who are active in weight lifting, power lifting, CrossFit, and endurance sports. After reviewing the principles of exercise prescription and programming applied to this population, clinicians will be able to develop an exercise program for an athlete who wishes to continue these activities without medical complications.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Upon completion of this course, you will be able to:

  1. Describe the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists’ (ACOG) and American College of Sports Medicine’s (ACSM) absolute and relative contraindications to exercise, and their clinical presentation in a physical therapist setting.
  2. Integrate knowledge of maternal and fetal physiology into physical therapy intervention selection and exercise prescription.
  3. Develop an exercise program for the power lifting, weight lifting, CrossFit, or endurance athlete who is pregnant or postpartum.

Global Volunteerism: From Organization to Boots on the Ground- Part 3 (3008042)

SPEAKERS: Lora A. Mize, Theresa Spitznagle

DESCRIPTION: There are a vast number of opportunities for volunteering on a global scale as a women’s health physical therapist. However, it can be difficult to discern what organizations are legitimate when trying to volunteer on medical mission trips. This session is the third part of a 3-part discussion on the opportunities for global leadership. It is a panel of physical therapists discussing taking students on medical mission trips.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Upon completion of this course, you will be able to:

  1. Examine opportunities for international education opportunities.
  2. Identify opportunities for student organizations to volunteer on a global scale.

 


Friday, January 25, 2019

8:00 AM – 10:00 AM

My Patient Still Has Lumbopelvic Pain After Delivery: Now What? (2986512)

SPEAKERS: Adrienne H. Simonds, Karen E. Abraham, Theresa Spitznagle

DESCRIPTION: The creation of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) is critical for establishing recommendations regarding the management of various conditions by physical therapists. Specifically, the examination and intervention provided by physical therapists to women in the postpartum period who demonstrate pelvic girdle pain should be guided by current best evidence. This session provides the rationale and methodology underlying a CPG directed toward identifying the current best evidence on postpartum pelvic girdle pain. The authors of the CPG present and discuss the recommendations for practice including risk factors, differential diagnosis, examination, and intervention.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Upon completion of this course, you will be able to:

  1. Identify the rationale for the development of a CPG for postpartum pelvic girdle pain to inform physical therapist practice, with particular differentiation between antepartum and postpartum needs.
  2. Summarize the processes used to develop the CPG.
  3. Apply intervention strategies to maximize function and minimize pain in individuals with postpartum pelvic girdle pain based on evidence-based recommendations.
  4. Provide a forum for interested parties to share feedback on the CPG.

Sports Hernia: A Multispecialty Approach to Diagnosis and Treatment (2986951)

SPEAKERS: Valerie Bobb, Mark Lydecker, Jenny A. LaCross

DESCRIPTION: The literature describes sports hernia as a syndrome ranging from generalized chronic groin pain to an actual disruption of functional pelvic stability. It occurs primarily in male athletes participating in hockey, football, basketball, soccer, military/tactical, and rugby. There are currently many terms in the literature to describe this syndrome including sportsman’s groin, athletic pubalgia, sports pubalgia, Gilmore groin, and hockey groin. The epidemiology of sports hernia is difficult to describe and a lack of a consistent definition has made it difficult for clinicians to diagnose and choose the best treatment plan. Additionally, the anatomy of the groin and pelvis is complex with many of the structures located deep, making them difficult to palpate from a purely orthopedic standpoint. This session educates participants on anatomy of the various structures involved, differential diagnosis for femoral acetabular impingement (FAI), pelvic nerve involvement, pubic symphysis dysfunction, adductor involvement, and demonstrates treatment from orthopedic and pelvic therapist’s perspectives.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Upon completion of this course, you will be able to:

  1. Identify common populations and risk factors for developing “sports hernia.”
  2. Describe the anatomy of the muscles, tendons, and nerves of the abdomen, pelvis and hip.
  3. Explain the differential diagnostic process for varying components of possible involved structures.
  4. List other specialties contributions to care of individuals presenting with this syndrome.
  5. Assess treatment based on patient presentations.
  6. Define common postoperative protocols.

Pregnancy and Childbirth-Related Pelvic Health: Pregnancy and Delivery Updates (2988218)

SPEAKERS: Susan C. Clinton, Jessica McKinney, Lisa Kane Low, Carolyn Swenson

DESCRIPTION: The impact of pregnancy and childbirth with respect to pelvic health and pelvic floor disorders has been long investigated, and there is growing interest from the public and among providers to identify successful strategies for prevention and recovery. This session convenes a multidisciplinary faculty with the purpose of exploring current literature and expert opinion regarding antenatal and intrapartum considerations in preservation of pelvic floor function, prevalence, and types of childbirth injuries and their immediate management. It also covers the current clinical practice guidelines on pelvic girdle pain in the antepartum population. The body of literature related to this is large and growing; however, it does not always connect the dots between the contributing factors of pregnancy, childbirth injuries and healing, pelvic floor-specific rehabilitation, and a more comprehensive rehabilitative approach that brings in all aspects of bowel, bladder, sexual health, as well as functional and recreational mobility. This session draws upon literature from various fields, as well as the clinical and research experience of providers in the field in order to provide participants with highlights to consider for their own practice.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Upon completion of this course, you will be able to:

  1. Describe risk factors for pelvic floor disorders that are associated with pregnancy.
  2. Identify risk factors for pelvic floor disorders that are associated with childbirth.
  3. Implement changes to practice for pelvic girdle pain during pregnancy.
  4. Gain insights to the decision-making process for delivery (vaginal and C-section).


11:00 AM – 1:00 PM

A Trauma-Informed Pathway to Caring for Patients and Providers (2985590)

SPEAKERS: Rachel E. Shepherd, Kenneth R. Yeager

DESCRIPTION: This session incorporates the work of Dr Kenneth Yeager, director of the Ohio State Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Health’s Stress, Trauma And Resilience (STAR) Program, with the current practice of physical therapy as it relates to (1) the care provided to patients who have experienced trauma, and (2) the care required for clinicians serving these patients.  Foundationally, this session comprehensively describes trauma-informed care and the application of its principles to current physical therapist practice. It clearly defines trauma and prepares participants with current best practices related to interacting with patients who have been shaped by such experiences. To appropriately prepare clinicians working with patients shaped by trauma, the speakers guide participants in identifying warning signs of compassion fatigue in themselves and their peers. Participants can expect to return to their clinical practice with tactical ways of caring for themselves in the prevention of professional burnout. Time is allocated at the end of the session to allow for questions and interaction among presenters and participants.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Upon completion of this course, you will be able to:

  1. Explain the basic principles of trauma-informed care and its application to participants’ current clinical practice.
  2. Identify signs and symptoms of compassion fatigue in clinicians and their colleagues.
  3. Describe a minimum of 3 strategies to protect clinicians from professional burnout.

Childbirth Related Pelvic Health and Rehabilitation: Postpartum Updates (2988272)

SPEAKERS: Susan C. Clinton, Jessica McKinney, Lisa Kane Low, Carolyn Swenson

DESCRIPTION: The impact of pregnancy and childbirth with respect to pelvic health and pelvic floor disorders has been long investigated, and there is growing interest from the public and among providers to identify successful strategies for prevention and recovery. This session convenes a multidisciplinary faculty with the purpose of exploring current literature and expert opinion regarding early and long-term postpartum considerations with respect to tissue healing principles, recovery from an uncomplicated pregnancy and childbirth, recovery from specific childbirth injuries, and lifetime incidence of pelvic floor disorders. The speakers present postpartum rehabilitation strategies including pelvic floor rehabilitation guidelines as well as comprehensive rehabilitation strategies, addressing toileting and bowel programs, sexual health, activities of daily living, and return to exercise. The speakers facilitate collaboration and dialogue that leads to additional innovation in clinical care and research for all providers involved and interested in the intersection of maternal health, urogynecology, and conservative care.

This session draws upon literature from various fields as well as the clinical and research experience of providers in the field to provide participants with highlights to consider in their own practice.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Upon completion of this course, you will be able to:

  1. Explain the risk factors for pelvic floor disorders that are associated with the postpartum time period.
  2. Describe what is known regarding types, prevalence, and impact of pelvic-related childbirth injuries, including lifetime incidence of pelvic floor disorders and surgery.
  3. Identify specific interventions with respect to pelvic floor muscle-specific rehabilitation, as well as comprehensive rehabilitation including toileting, sexual health, and functional activities.
  4. Discuss the parameters of return to exercise and sport in the postpartum era.

 

Complex Cases in Women’s and Men’s Health (3026637)

SPEAKERS: Carina Siracusa

DESCRIPTION: 6 cases will be presented based on submissions on varies topics on women’s and men’s health. Cases will be selected from a pool of submissions by assistant programming chair and chair as needed

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Upon completion of this course, you will be able to:

  1. Discuss evidence-based practice used to treat complex cases in women’s and men’s health.
  2. Identify priority and clinical decision making when multiple diagnoses present in the same case.


3:00 PM – 5:00 PM

Pursuing Personal Goals Through a Variety of Paths: Perspectives from Residents (2985889)

SPEAKERS: Valerie Bobb, Theresa Spitznagle

DESCRIPTION: In the recently updated Description of Specialty Practice, women’s health encompasses women’s, men’s, and pediatric pelvic work as well as a variety of other health conditions, ranging from lymphedema to abdominovisceral issues. The field of women’s health physical therapy is constantly evolving, and practicing physical therapists often feel compelled to add disclaimers to their identity that define what they do and do not treat. Women’s health physical therapy is everywhere, regardless of how you personally choose to define the field or your relation to it. This session enables residents to offer their unique perspectives on how to balance their diverse interests, including women’s health, with the deliberate career paths they have chosen in a variety of specialties. You don’t have to identify as a women’s health PT or be a board-certified clinical specialist in women’s health physical therapy to be a part of the field. This session is designed to help you find your path. It has a polling feature to ensure that the content meets the needs of the audience (eg, students, early professionals, established therapists). Additional resources are also provided following the session through the Section on Women’s Health Student Special Interest Group (SSIG).

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Upon completion of this course, you will be able to:

  1. Discuss each resident’s interests in women’s health and how it is uniquely integrated in their residency and career path.
  2. Explain different ways to explore personal goals in a variety of settings.
  3. Identify opportunities for women’s health content in current curriculum or personal path.
  4. Allow students to ask the resident panel questions.

Empowering Women Leaders in Physical Therapy (2986850)

SPEAKERS: Stephanie Fournier, Deydre Teyhen, Margaret E. Lonnemann, Billie J. Randolph

DESCRIPTION: Women are not new to leadership—think of Cleopatra, Queen Elizabeth, and Florence Kendall. But women are outnumbered by men in the most prestigious positions, from Capitol Hill to the board room. This session examines the cause of women’s underrepresentation in leadership roles in physical therapy and suggests what we can do to change the status quo. It explores the unique challenges faced by women as they navigate various paths of leadership. The speakers integrate current literature regarding challenges women in leadership roles face, and highlight specific ways that individual speakers have mastered those obstacles. Participants learn about the unique challenges that women face in leadership roles globally, in military, and in civilian sectors and discuss best practice models to overcome obstacles and lead with enriched understanding.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Upon completion of this course, you will be able to:

  1. Discuss challenges and benefits of female leaders in health care with a specific focus on physical therapy.
  2. Describe attributes of a good leader and compare with current literature.
  3. Analyze current literature regarding barriers specific to women in leadership roles in health care.
  4. Examine roles that specific catalysts played in the speakers’ lives, which empowered them in their personal leadership journey.

Health Coaching Skills to Improve Patient Compliance and Prevent PT Burnout (2968328)

SPEAKERS: Jessica Drummond

DESCRIPTION: Adherence to physical therapy treatment recommendations can influence treatment outcomes. Although much of the research focus has been on patient factors influencing compliance such as low self-efficacy, depression, anxiety, helplessness, and poor social support, practitioners have a responsibility to optimize treatment adherence as well for the benefit of their patients. Health coaching communication skills are a useful suite of specific tools that have been successfully employed to improve medication adherence and blood pressure control. Health coaching is also being explored to improve the quality of life for patients with chronic pain and mobility limiting conditions, such as knee osteoarthritis. Physical therapists have a responsibility to learn these tools and/or learn to collaborate with qualified health coaches in order to improve their patients’ treatment outcomes. As an added benefit, physical therapists who put these patient-centered communication skills into their practices are reporting less burnout, as their patients become more self-motivated.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Upon completion of this course, you will be able to:

  1. Describe the health coaching communication process as a strategy for optimizing patient outcomes.
  2. Apply at least 4 health coaching communication skills to support patient-centered adherence to the physical therapy treatment plan.
  3. Identify and collaborate with skilled health coaches, and understand the International Consortium for Health and Wellness Coaching board-certification process for health coaches.
  4. Illustrate health coaching communication skills to collaborate with your patients to clarify and define physical therapy treatment goals that are meaningful to them, and devise an accountability plan that your patients can follow.


Saturday, January 26, 2019

8:00 AM – 10:00 AM

Pelvic Floor Implications for the Running Athlete (2978142)

SPEAKERS: Amanda A. Olson, Cristine Agresta

DESCRIPTION: Pelvic floor dysfunction can be both a cause and a product of mechanical issues. Running is a complex biomechanical process that is often correlated with a comorbidity of pelvic floor dysfunction. Runners have unique physical, nutritional, and psychological needs that require special attention from pelvic health physical therapists. Additionally, runners often present to orthopedic specialists with persistent knee and hip injuries that may be affected by pelvic floor impairments. These can be overlooked during typical orthopedic assessment. Pelvic health PTs and orthopedic PTs are natural leaders of musculoskeletal rehabilitation of runners. These therapists will learn important skills to work together and provide necessary physical therapy treatment to address pelvic issues for runners.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Upon completion of this course, you will be able to:

  1. Identify the role of the pelvic physical therapist in managing an injured runner.
  2. Recognize pelvic floor dysfunction based upon presentation of an injured runner.
  3. Ascertain key biomechanical impairments that contribute to injuries during the running gait.
  4. Integrate treatment methods of the injured runner with pelvic floor impairments.

 

Reject or Correct? A Guide to Effective Feedback on the Road to Publication (2979012)

SPEAKERS: Mary Dockter, Karen E. Abraham, Meryl J. Alappattu, Mark D. Bishop, Cynthia M. Chiarello, Patricia R. Nelson, Rebecca Reisch, Theresa Spitznagle

DESCRIPTION: Effectively disseminating the results of clinical inquiries is central to forging a strong body of knowledge to underpin practice. The Journal of Women’s Health Physical Therapy is research-relevant to abdominal and pelvic health physical therapy and other concerns that impact the rehabilitation of women. This 2-part session focuses on both successfully authoring a manuscript for the journal as well as the process of peer review. The speakers first take you through the manuscript submission process from initial submission to publication. They discuss the various types of research designs from case reports to clinical trials. Participants will know how to plan for, execute, and complete a successful research project. Additionally, participants discuss ways to collaborate with peers and academic partners in order to enhance clinical research.

In the second part, the speakers provide valuable insight into the peer-review process including how to become a reviewer, what the process of peer review entails, the key components of submitting a quality review, and how to communicate to editors and authors in a collegial and constructive manner that facilitates improvement of a manuscript.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Upon completion of this course, you will be able to:

  1. Describe the process of peer review, including the role of peer reviewer, and how an editor uses the reviews to decide the status of a manuscript.
  2. Identify critical components of completing a quality review.
  3. Summarize key components in preparing, submitting, and responding to reviews in order to achieve a publication-worthy manuscript.
  4. Network with experts and peers to stimulate ideas for scholarships as well as to gain insight into the publication and review process.

Physical Therapy Considerations in Gender Affirming Genital Surgery (2985918)

SPEAKERS: Sandra Gallagher, Mary M. Austin

DESCRIPTION: Pelvic health physical therapists can play an important role in preparing people for gender affirming surgery and guiding the recovery to improve the outcome of the surgery. This can include assessing pelvic muscle function, bowel, bladder, and breathing mechanisms and general mobility for the needed postop care. Once the surgery is completed monitoring healing and progressing with function are key roles for the therapist. The first speaker has been involved in preop and postop vaginoplasty care for 2 years, working closely with urology to enhance the surgical experience and outcome. The second speaker is beginning a similar program within her hospital setting.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Upon completion of this course, you will be able to:

  1. Recognize the value that physical therapy brings to success with gender affirming surgery.
  2. Apply skills needed for general pelvic health conditions for people undergoing a specific genital surgery.


11:00 AM – 1:00 PM

You’ve Gotta Be KIDney Me! Pediatric Pelvic Health Prerenal and Postrenal Transplant (2988389)

SPEAKERS: Whitney Bartley, Lindsey Baskerville

DESCRIPTION: Urinary complications are frequently reported in pediatric patients with kidney disease both prerenal and postrenal transplantation. Patients with this complex diagnosis are often symptomatic of chronic pelvic pain, urinary incontinence, urinary retention, recurrent urinary tract infections, and constipation. These complications can lead to long-term voiding dysfunction and, many times, this includes the functionality of the pelvic floor. Recent studies have shown the prevalence of lower urinary tract symptoms among pediatric patients with kidney disease to be nearly 20%. This dysfunction can have negative effects on the patient’s quality of life including risk of disease progression, loss of renal graft, and increased mortality rate postrenal transplant.

This session discusses the relationship between pediatric kidney disease, lower urinary tract symptoms, and pelvic floor dysfunction. The content will encompass a scope of knowledge from anatomy and physiology of the urinary system and pelvic floor, processes related to pediatric kidney disease, and considerations for pelvic physical therapy intervention prerenal and postrenal transplantation.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Upon completion of this course, you will be able to: 1. Describe the processes related to pediatric kidney disease and the resulting physiological effects on the musculoskeletal system.

  1. Explain the clinical connection between the anatomy and physiology of the pelvic floor and its relationship with long-term renal health.

3) Consider methods for pelvic physical therapy evaluation and treatment prerenal and postrenal transplantation.

Staying Fit Beyond Menopause Through Early Screening and Training (2975067)

SPEAKERS: Karen Snowden and Karen L. Litos

DESCRIPTION: “I’m not there yet.” Menopause is a wake-up call for lifestyle changes that many women don’t want to think about until they experience symptoms. Unfortunately, they miss their best window of opportunity to modify risk factors in the years prior to and immediately following menopause. Providers, including PTs, are failing these women. They often lack screening tools and knowledge of the latest evidence for the treatment and prevention of diseases and symptoms associated with menopause-related hormonal changes that are necessary to offer guidance in a timely manner. PTs, as musculoskeletal experts, are in a unique position to help more women through early screening, education, and specific training to maximize bone and muscle strength for improved health post menopause. Menopause is a complex physiological process of hormonal changes, notably declining estrogen. Making specific lifestyle changes can build and maintain bodily strength before, during, and after the menopause transition, positively impacting a woman’s health long term. Participants will understand hormonal influences impacting women’s health at menopause, use of an appropriate screening tool, and clinical applications to physical therapy.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Upon completion of this course, you will be able to:

  1. Discuss the physiologic impact of reduced estrogen on muscle and bone strength in menopausal women.
  2. Perform an appropriate screening tool for women in order to identify those at current or future risk for symptoms and diseases related to estrogen depletion.
  3. Describe evidence-based physical therapy treatment to enhance bone and muscle strength before, during, and after the menopause years.


3:00 PM – 5:00 PM

Electrical Stimulation for Neuromodulation and Motor Function in Pelvic Health (2985979)

SPEAKERS: Sandra Gallagher, Mary M. Austin

DESCRIPTION: Electrical stimulation (ES) is often categorized as passive treatment. Yet evidence shows incredible effectiveness in managing sensory conditions of the pelvic region, such as urinary urgency, urge incontinence, fecal urgency, and incontinence and pelvic pain. Treatment can be completed at home and is a cost effective internal locus of control-driven treatment. Additionally, systematic reviews show equivocal evidence for gaining motor function with ES, but when data is analyzed for adherence to strength and conditioning principles, ES can be an effective tool for strengthening pelvic floor muscles.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Upon completion of this course, you will be able to:

  1. Describe options for neuromodulation of pelvic conditions using electrical stimulation home units.
  2. Provide options for strengthening programs using electrical stimulation home units.
  3. Develop an ES home program for improving strength of the pelvic floor muscles.

Pelvic Health PT Program Development: Unique Challenges and Varied Experiences (2986386)

SPEAKERS: Stephanie Fournier, Leigh Anne Lechanski, Valerie Bobb

DESCRIPTION: Women’s health or pelvic health physical therapy is an exciting and growing specialty. As more physical therapists become interested, we see new challenges emerge in the application of such innovative programs and variations in practice setting. This session provides valuable insight from pelvic health specialists on the challenges and opportunities of starting a pelvic health physical therapy specialty program in multiple settings including private, corporate, and federal practices. This session helps those who are interested in starting programs by imparting practical knowledge that can assist in program start-up and development. It also aids established clinicians and programs by sharing best practices in program development and growth. The speakers share knowledge gained from the community of practitioners regarding common barriers in starting and sustaining specialty programs in a variety of practice settings.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Upon completion of this course, you will be able to:

  1. Discuss results of a national Section on Women’s Health survey of practice management patterns, including resource management and program development.
  2. Provide case study examples of 4 different practice settings: federal, hospital, private, and cash/independent programs with practical insight and authentic experiences executing pelvic health programs.
  3. Highlight the value of pelvic health programming on health care costs, outcomes, and patient satisfaction with a review of the literature to equip personnel with justifications to start their own program.
  4. Conduct a panel discussion to answer audience members’ specific questions and concerns in their own settings.

 

Women’s Health and Human Rights: A Framework for Global and Community Health Programs (2986856)

SPEAKERS: Laura Keyser, Jessica McKinney, Lara Wrigley

DESCRIPTION: Human rights violations, including gender-based violence (GBV), are at the root of many women’s health concerns in the United States and abroad. GBV, including sexual violence and systematic rape in conflict, disproportionately impacts women with rates as high as 40% in some regions. Experiences of GBV are linked with serious adverse health conditions, including pelvic floor disorders, musculoskeletal complaints, neurologic injury and mental health concerns, limiting women’s participation in society. Furthermore, sexual and reproductive health involves not only intact pelvic organs and a functional pelvic floor, but also psychological health, socioeconomic status, and legal rights. As experts in function and mitigating the impact of disability, physical therapists may influence each of these aspects of care. Yet health systems commonly have deficient rehabilitation services to help women fully recover from a health condition, or to manage their health condition in a way that decreases the burden of disability. This session presents a health and human rights framework for women’s health program development, including the role of physical therapy, with a case-focus on eastern Democratic Republic of Congo and additional examples from the United States.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Upon completion of this course, you will be able to:

  1. Describe a human rights-based approach (HRBA) in the context of physical therapy and women’s health.
  2. Provide a guiding framework for physical therapy and rehabilitative interventions to address the physical and mental health needs of survivors of sexual violence and trauma.
  3. Apply HRBA to physical therapy program development using 2 case examples; 1 United States-based and 1 international.

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